This is Your Life

BlogEamonnAndrewsThere were many television programmes in my childhood that I took for granted and only appreciated once they were gone. ‘This is Your Life’ was one example of a show that was simple on format but very enjoyable when the surprised guest was right. Throughout the seventies, I was aware of this programme, presented by Eamonn Andrews.  He had actually presented it in its initial British version from the 50s to 1964 and then again from 1969 until he died in 1987.  Michael Aspel took over for a time in the late 80s until it finished in 2003.  Although I saw some of the Aspel programmes it is Eamonn Andrews I remember well, along with the music of Thames Television’s audio ‘ident’.

Back in the 70s, with a limited number of television channels, each programme was guaranteed a very large audience so television series as this were known to most of the country.  Watching a famous person being surprised by Eamonn Andrews was part of the fun; the ‘victims’ were never in the know but they knew what seeing Eamonn Andrews meant, especially when he had a red book in his hands.

The episodes I remember best of all were Frankie Howerd’s when he cried, made especially poignant when it later turned out that his partner in life was discretely placed across the stage; heterosexual couples sat side by side!  I also remember Reg Varney from the phenomenally successful sit-com ‘On the Buses’ looking alarmed when his rehearsed spot was interrupted by the red book.

It was classed as popular entertainment but, like much of television from that era, it treated the audience’s intelligence with respect.

Boy with a Dolphin: Book

BlogBoyDolphinBookI have long been a fan of David Wynne’s work as a sculptor.  There are so many London landmarks improved by the siting of one of his sculptures. Other places, too, have benefited from his talent, including Newcastle, but it is London I know best and it was here that I first put the name of the artist to the work I most admired: Boy with a Dolphin.

This book, which takes its title from his most famous work, is actually a review of his career.  Published before his death in 2014, the book includes photographs of him working as well as of the final pieces in situ.  There are still places I need to go to see his sculpture and some are in the hands of private collectors or private companies so will possibly be beyond sight unless there is a retrospective at a major gallery.

The best aspect of the book is the insight into the creative process.  There are quotes from interviews with Wynne himself as well as excerpts from newspapers and magazines.  David Wynne was friends with people in high places and many of his commissions came from someone who knew someone.  As an essentially self- taught artist, though, the fact that so many pieces are on public display is the best outcome for me.

This book with its extensive illustrations is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Gaffer Samson’s Luck

This children’s novel by Jill Paton Walsh from 1988 is a wonderful evocation of what it is like to be dislocated as a child.  James is new to the Fens, having moved with his parents because of their jobs.  He finds himself as the outsider in a village where the children divide themselves neatly into ‘estate’ and ‘village’.  As he belongs to neither group, James feels even more alone.  It is a good job, then, that the old man next door is so interesting.

Mr Samson, the ‘gaffer’ of the title, is a widower who befriends the young boy providing him with someone to talk to.  Such inter-generational friendships may now be threatened but in times past the wisdom of an older person could be passed on.  Jill Paton Walsh captures well this friendship across the age gap.

James gets thrown together with Angey, another school outsider.  The situation doesn’t help his case for being accepted but, when he goes on a mission for the gaffer, she is a useful ally.

Things come to a head when the gang mentality threatens James and Angey and he finds himself trying to help an ailing Mr Samson while standing up to bullies.

The novel explores themes of belonging, bullying, age and facing death all within a story of a boy in a village in the East of England.  The book won the prestigious Smarties Prize and should, by now, qualify for classic status.  It is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

 

I Must Belong Somewhere

I heard Jonathan Dean, the author of this excellent book, speak at the Bath Festival this year.  Having heard him talk about identity and nationality I was keen to read his story of a search into family history; his grandfather and great- grandfather had both been refugees in their early lives.  What makes this book stand out from others of a similar vein is the background in which he is writing.  The UK referendum on EU membership has changed the way we talk about belonging and foreigners.  There is a new found assertiveness among those who voted Leave for saying what they think about people who are different.  This raises questions which Jonathan Dean uses in his exploration of his own family:  would they be welcome now?  Would Britain accept people fleeing for their lives or does the fact that modern refugees mostly have different coloured skin make a difference?

BlogIMustBelongSomewhereUsing his grandfather’s diaries and letters and his great- grandfather’s memoir, the author shows that leaving home is never easy.  Trying to make a new life in a new country is full of difficulties.  What does it mean to fit in?

Throughout the book, he traces their steps, taking in significant places on both men’s journeys.  Heinz, his grandfather fled Vienna for Britain before the start of the Second World War.  With his brother, he left his parents behind to be sent to concentration camps.  Being Jewish, the need to escape to safety was obvious but they had to go without their parents.  Heinz’s story is one of becoming British.  He stayed here and raised his family as British.

David, his great- grandfather, lived out his life in the Vienna from which Heinz fled.  But this was not where he was from. Just as his son made Britain his home, the father found sanctuary in Austria as a refugee from a town in what was then Poland but is now Ukraine.  It is one of the fascinating aspects of this book that he returned to live in Vienna after the concentration camp experience, living among people who had been happy to see him carted off.

The book is an important one.  The rise of a new nationalism is fed by the Leave result of the referendum but casual xenophobia should not be allowed a free ride.  This book reminds us of the humane reasons for refuge and the fact that for many people seeking asylum is a necessity, not a choice.

‘I Must Belong Somewhere’ is in my hinterland. What’s in yours?

 

World in Action

This documentary series, broadcast on ITV, was an important part of my education in current affairs and politics when I was growing up.  The 30 minute programmes opened my eyes to global issues as well as the social situation in Britain.  It ran from the early 60s until the 90s but I was most aware of it during the 70s, a decade when some of the most amazing programmes were broadcast.

BlogWorldinActionThe programme was created by ITV when it wore its regional and federal structure with pride, a situation that meant that different television companies contributed their best ideas to the network knowing there was competition in intellectual terms from the other companies in the ITV group.  Maybe this is why ITV has dumbed down over the years at the same pace as it has become one company rather than a federation of regional franchises.  Granada was the company in the Manchester and north-west region.

I encountered some of the most important journalists of my youth on this series, John Pilger the most notable.  His films about Vietnam were excellent.  I also remember programmes about the far right National Front party which was growing in the 70s and Gay Pride, a film from 1979.

This series was broadcast at a time when television treated its viewers as grown ups.  It is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

 

The Man Who Knew Infinity

This film, while not destined for classic status, reminded me of the Merchant Ivory films of the 80s when historical settings showed Britain as a good-looking country at the same time as reminding us that the views and standards of the time are best left in the past.  In this case, the story from the early part of the Twentieth Century is based on the real case of an Indian man whose genius with number leads him from his home to Cambridge where he studies with the famous G.H Hardy.

BlogManInfinity

Srinivasa Ramanujan was born into a poor family in Madras, India.  He performed menial tasks to earn a living but found beauty in mathematics.  His employers realised he had exceptional skills and used him for accounting purposes until they decided his personal journals on number should reach a wider public.  This led to Britain, Cambridge and Professor Hardy at Trinity College.

The stuffy and hierarchical nature of Cambridge is well portrayed along with the stereo-type that academics are not quite part of the real world.  Real enough, though, is the racism Ramanujan faces in pre- First World War Britain.  Not only are the dons suspicious of his ability but they also see him as an upstart for moving into their world without moving through the proper channels.

There is a sub-plot set against the First World War showing how academics split in terms of their support for the war.  Key figures from that time took different paths: Bertrand Russell to pacifism (and consequently to prison) and John Edensor Littlewood to the army (to help with ballistics).

Dev Patel played Ramanujan and Jeremy Irons played Hardy, the significant difference in their ages not reflected in the real story!  It works as a film, though, because it shows that some people will fight against racism and pursue their ambitions despite it.  It also shows that academic endeavour is worth the years of struggle.  For Ramanujan, the return to India, while in triumph as an accepted academic, was personally difficult and he did not have a long life.

Jeremy Irons is always worth watching and so, it seems, is Dev Patel.  This film is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Thank You Steve Bell

I want to pay tribute to the cartoonist Steve Bell whose work in ‘The Guardian’ newspaper keeps me sane in these uncertain times. He always seems to express a sense of fun and a glimmer of hope while skewering the self- righteous.  Never has he been more needed than during this UK election period, an election that was unnecessary in any case and was little more than a vanity project for the current Prime Minister.  When we wake up tomorrow, there might be good news.  However, Steve Bell will have something to say/write/draw that will speak for many of us.