A Year in Marrakesh

This is an interesting book even if it wasn’t the book I thought it would be!  Peter Mayne moved to Morocco in the early 50s to write a novel.  Instead of the fiction work he imagined, his time in the country resulted in this journal of his year in Marrakesh.

BlogMarrakeshHaving lived in Pakistan, Mayne knew something of the Muslim way of life but the year spent in Morocco proved to be eye-opening for many reasons.  He was determined not to be seen as a tourist, to live in the old city even though this meant giving up the modern comforts, and to forge friendships with the local people.

The resulting journal is a record of his daily efforts to fit in.  His accommodation changes several times and much of the book is taken up with efforts to secure a roof over his head on reasonable terms.  He also talks about his relationships with locals who have different expectations about trade and financial understandings.

The time he writes about has passed and with it many of the attitudes expressed here by ‘westerners’ and the Moroccans.  I expected a book where the author led us through the sites and gave us local flavour.  He does the latter  but only in as much as it relates to the business of buying, eating, seeking accommodation.  There is little of Mayne himself revealed in this book.  We do not find out much about him.  I was keen to know how he could afford a year without income from any work.  There is no hinterland of interest or experience. What we have instead is a picture of a city in a country before it went through great changes- Morocco became independent in 1956.  He captures life in one place at one time and does it well.  ‘A Year in Marrakesh’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

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Letters from Baghdad

I have long thought that Gertrude Bell’s life would make an amazing film.  Not only did she tread a path that few women had in her time but she also was another Westerner who fell in love with the East.  In the ways of the British Empire, she was in love with a part of the world that the British controlled and aware that there was a conflict in admiring the people who were subjugated to British rule. No matter how benevolent the rule was, it was rule nevertheless.

The documentary has Tilda Swinton reading extracts from her letters, usually to those ‘back home’ while archive footage and photographs of Bell are shown on-screen.  That we never see Tilda Swinton ‘as’ Gertrude Bell is a wise move since the photographic image of her is not affected.  Other people feature, people who knew her well, such as T. E. Lawrence, but these people are played by actors and we see them in black and white addressing the camera. Bell’s non- presence is all the more powerful because of this technique.

The story of the young woman who gained a First in History and who then turned East is a wonderful one.  Her knowledge of the people and places of the Middle East made her a key figure in the peace conference following the First World War.  Her role in setting up a country called Iraq before serving the government there in the field of archaeology illustrates well the way women were treated and viewed.  In many cases, she was referred to as a ‘right hand man’.  She understood she did not fit in when the social occasions were put on, organised as they were for the men and their wives.  She was not really accepted in either group.

The film is in black and white throughout making the archive footage stand out.  It is a very good introduction to the life of an amazing woman.  ‘Letters from Baghdad’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

 

 

 

Crusade

This 2007 novel by Elizabeth Laird is the type of adventure story I loved as a boy but with one difference: she tells the story from both sides of the crusade in which the forces of France and England attempted to take back control of Jerusalem from the Muslims.  Adam is an English boy whose mother dies leaving him to take work in the castle under his Lordship.  He starts as a dog boy but finds himself on his way to war when his Lord joins the Holy Crusade.  Salim is a son of a merchant but he has a deformity that sees him apprenticed to a Jewish doctor who is heading home to Jerusalem.  What the boys have in common is displacement from their families followed by involuntary involvement in a war.  What they also share is a conviction that their cause is just. They are, however, on other sides of the conflict so when they meet they do not see each other as allies or friends.

The strength of this novel is the parallel narrative.  We know, or can presume, that they will meet but under what circumstances?  Their journeys take them to Acre. Adam finds himself serving as a squire and Salim assists his doctor.  They should not meet except in battle but they do.

Elizabeth Laird uses her characters to explore this historical event from both sides.  With both sides believing their mission is a holy one, the idea of right and wrong is explored through the motivations of Salim and Adam.  The Jewish doctor allows the author to show the Crusade in the context of greater complexity as one faith against another. There is reference to historical figures such as King Richard and Saladin but the action is centred on the younger characters and it is the better for it.

 

 

 

Partition

The poem by Auden about the work (and supposed attitude) of Sir Cyril Radcliffe, the man given the task of dividing India into two new countries, seems somewhat harsh in light of the history books that suggest that he was a man brought low by the task and the repercussions.  He famously refused his fee.

I am unclear about the date this poem was written so cannot tell what the prevailing mood was about the man and his task.

Partition

Unbiased at least he was when he arrived on his mission,
Having never set eyes on the land he was called to partition
Between two peoples fanatically at odds,
With their different diets and incompatible gods.
“Time,” they had briefed him in London, “is short. It’s too late
For mutual reconciliation or rational debate:
The only solution now lies in separation.
The Viceroy thinks, as you will see from his letter,
That the less you are seen in his company the better,
So we’ve arranged to provide you with other accommodation.
We can give you four judges, two Moslem and two Hindu,
To consult with, but the final decision must rest with you.”

Shut up in a lonely mansion, with police night and day
Patrolling the gardens to keep the assassins away,
He got down to work, to the task of settling the fate
Of millions. The maps at his disposal were out of date
And the Census Returns almost certainly incorrect,
But there was no time to check them, no time to inspect
Contested areas. The weather was frightfully hot,
And a bout of dysentery kept him constantly on the trot,
But in seven weeks it was done, the frontiers decided,
A continent for better or worse divided.

The next day he sailed for England, where he could quickly forget
The case, as a good lawyer must. Return he would not,
Afraid, as he told his Club, that he might get shot. 

W H Auden

BlogAudenolder

Partition: Radio Play

BlogPartition

Every once in a while I stumble across something golden while searching for something else.  Having thought the radio dramatisation of Salman Rushdie’s novel ‘Midnight’s Children’ was fantastic, I was pleased to discover this BBC Leeds radio play by Nick Ahad. Ordinarily, I would have no reason to listen to a Leeds radio station since I do not live anywhere near but I was searching for information about the partition of India at the end of British rule and came across this production by accident.

The play is a joint project with the West Yorkshire Playhouse where it was staged following the radio broadcast.

‘Partition’ tells the story of the past by focusing on the present day relationship between a couple about to get married.  He is a Sikh and she is a Muslim.  Their families have been invited to the wedding but her mother and his grandfather will not attend.  We may be in present day Leeds but history is not in the past for the generation that experienced the partition of India.

The play takes us on the wedding day to the ceremony where officials are used to dealing with unusual experiences, except for the registrar, this is her very first time officiating at a wedding and the non- arrival of witnesses is going to be a problem.  Both bride and groom- to- be are relying on their respective family members coming; witnesses from the street would be needed if they don’t turn up.  The play shows us what obstacles would need to be overcome to face a marriage across the divide.

‘Partition’ by Nick Ahad is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

The Blood Stone

This novel by Jamila Gavin is called an epic on the front cover of the version I have and I do not think this is misplaced.  I could see this story of spies and intrigue making a very good film or television series.

The story centres around young Filippo whose family is in dire straits after the disappearance of his father into India many years ago.  Geronimo Veraneo is a jeweller in search of precious stones, hence the trip to India to find them.  He never returns and the family fear he is a prisoner of an Afghan warlord.  His wife refuses to believe he is dead even though her son-in-law wants to have him declared so and thereby inherit the family fortune.  He believes the family holds a precious diamond, the Blood Stone of the title, and he wants to find it.  He has spies among the servants but is unable to track it down.

When news reaches them that their father is still alive, it is decided that Filippo should be the one to travel to India to pay the diamond as ransom money.  The blood stone is sewn into his head and the adventure begins.

It is unclear who to trust but young Filippo makes the journey across the Middle East from Italy to India.

There are sub-plots involving the daughter married to the unscrupulous son-in-law, Filippo’s friend and his family, and the brothers who are apprentice jewellers.  Like other stories by Jamila Gavin, there is the crossing of borders, both physical and cultural but the main narrative is one of adventure and intrigue.

‘The Blood Stone’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Our Man in the Middle East

Jeremy Bowen is something of a BBC star as far as I am concerned.  His level headed reporting from one of the world’s hottest regions is always worth listening to.  He seems to get across complex ideas with clarity and he is not prone to that modern journalistic disease which rates feelings over facts and imagery over clarity.

This series of short (fifteen minute) radio programmes, broadcast by BBC Radio Four, allows him the opportunity to reflect on his twenty five years of reporting from the Middle East.  I remember most of the stories the covered even if many of them were long forgotten to me.  He carefully crafts a modern history of the region through returning to his news reports.

The series is not without feeling, how could it be, when as a journalist, he has seen some terrible things?  Yet, while showing his humanity he never forgets that his job is to report the facts and get the stories out.  There are brief glimpses behind the scene as well, though.  He tells the story of his dinner party for fellow journalists on the night Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was murdered.

‘Our Man in the Middle East’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?