Batman

Reading about the recent death of Adam West who played the Batman of my childhood made me reflect on the fact that the images of our formative years remain with us, despite later re-boots. Therefore, whenever anyone mentions Batman it is the image of the television series from the mid- 60s that comes to mind.

I was of an age that took these things very seriously so I did not, at the time, recognise any of the features that were later described as ‘camp’.  I did not realise that the series was from another country, they spoke English after all.  To me, it was all worth my attention and belief.  I identified more with Robin than Batman, possibly because he was younger and I was a child.

I gave all the later films a miss.  I grew away from Batman and superheroes generally but the truth is that the mid-60s television version remained with me and, when I heard the sad news about Adam West, there were all the images and references from childhood just waiting to return.  Batman, Robin, the Joker, the Riddler and the Penguin were all there (but in black and white- this was British television, 60s style!)

batman_and_robin_06

Pigeon English

This novel by Stephen Kelman is told in the engaging voice of Harrison, a boy from Ghana, in London to start a new life with his mother and sister (another sister and his father are still in Africa but hoping to come to Britain).  The world as seen by an eleven year old in a new country is fascinating, especially as he tries to negotiate social conventions and the pecking order of school boys.

This is London, though, where knife crime is a big problem; already a teenage boy has been killed and Harri sees himself as the detective who can solve the crime.  This makes him watchful and alert to those around him.  His older sister’s choice of friends is not wise and this brings her and Harri closer to some unsavoury characters.

The world of children trying to be both tougher than they should be and more worldly wise is effectively evoked.  Harri’s voice carries us through the story, observing the world and making sense of it. His optimism is infectious, especially his hope that his younger sister and father will soon arrive and they will all be united.  This is the background for a further, dramatic event that non-plussed me and left me feeling sad about all the Harris in the world.

Gravel Heart

BlogGravelHeartI am a great fan of the novels of Abdulrazak Gurnah so this new story is very welcome. Once again, he writes of dislocation through living in another country yet unable to leave the old country behind.  In this case, the story of Salim starts with the unravelling of his parents’ marriage for reasons that remain unclear until the end of the book.  It is clear to Salim, though, that everyone else seems to know more than they are telling him.

His life is Zanzibar becomes one of trying to work out the reason his parents live apart, his father in depressed circumstances.  The presence of an Uncle, brother to his mother, offers a solution: the young man can live with Uncle Amir in London where he lives well with his own family in Holland Park in London; the diplomatic service offer good homes to their people.  So, once again, Salim finds himself adrift but this time in a foreign country.  He comes close to the parental secret on one occasion but otherwise continues semi- detached from the family.  When he takes a decision about his own future that annoys Amir, he leaves for a less well off part of London and a more independent stage of his life, one that eventually takes him to Brighton before returning to London.

Wherever he lives, though, Zanzibar is present.  He has contact with his mother but does not build the bridges he thinks he should, especially when she marries again and has a daughter.

Salim finds love but, once more, does not fit in.  It takes a family death to bring the resolution he needs.  He travels back to his home for rituals and for home truths.

One of the decisions he made for himself back in Holland Park was to abandon Business Studies for Literature, a decision that was to stand him in good stead when his family secret resembles a plot from a Shakespearian play.  The book must be read to discover which one.  Salim is a character I wanted to follow.  I wanted it to turn out well for him. He deserved it.  ‘Gravel Heart’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Exposure

This terrific novel by Helen Dunmore reminded me so much of ‘The Railway Children’ although it is adults who take centre stage in this story of the fall- out from espionage in 50s Britain.  It is an ‘ordinary’ family that suffers when things go wrong for the husband; his wife and three children have to pick up the pieces and live with the consequences of public exposure.

Simon Callington is a man trying to escape his past but whose friendships threaten his new life with his wife and children in a comfortable corner of London.  In particular, his past association with Giles causes him trouble.  They were lovers when Simon was a student with Giles, as the older man, enjoying the patronage he can bestow.  They have moved on but the friendship continues… and when Giles presumes on this friendship it starts a chain of events that lead to disgrace.

Lily, Simon’s wife, has already made a new start in life when her mother brought her from Germany to England and safety in an earlier era.  Lily knows what it is like to start again with nothing.  She did not think this would be her fate twice in her life.

Simon, Lily and Giles all feature prominently in a novel which reminds us of 50s attitudes to outsiders.  The paranoia around cold war spying adds another dimension to the suffering of one family.  As the novel moves towards its end, I was reminded again of the connection with ‘The Railway Children’ and I hoped for that dramatic moment (from the film at least) of a father being reunited with his children.  Life is rarely so neat and tidy, though.

Acting with integrity and honour is an important theme in the book.  Simon’s past has not been shared with his wife and the effect on her and his children is central in his thinking as he faces disgrace.  Lily is the most impressive figure here, her determination to survive and to shield her son and daughters from the shame.  1950s Britain fares less well; the sense of who can and should belong in our society is one of the less admirable features of that era.

‘Exposure’ by Helen Dunmore is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

BlogExposure

Room 1900

In London at Tate Britain to see an exhibition so I took the opportunity to re-visit some of my favourite works of art on display in the ‘Walk Through British Art’ galleries.  The room I love most of all, in this chronological arrangement, is Room 1900 where the end of the Victorian and start of the Edwardian age is celebrated.

There are many works here that I admire but, on this occasion, I was keen to see a sculpture by James Havard Thomas, a sculptor active from the 1880s onwards until his death in 1921.  The particular work is called ‘Lycidas’. It is a life-sized nude sculpture of a young man.  His model was Antonio, his Italian servant from the time when the artist lived in Southern Italy.  The work was rejected in 1905 by the Royal Academy as being too life- like and ordinary.  What Antonio made of this rejection is not known!

Lycidas 1902-8 by James Havard Thomas 1854-1921

Tate Britain is a Treasure House

In London, so off to Tate Britain to see the exhibition ‘Queer British Art: 1867- 1967’, held to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passing of legislation to partially decriminalise homosexuality.  The gallery was heaving with visitors heading for the major David Hockney show; somewhat telling that a gay artist drew bigger crowds than this attempt to show how being gay influenced the art.

I had a few problems with this exhibition, the largest being that not all the artists featured were known to be gay.  The suggestion that he or she might have been is just a posh version of what the awful tabloid newspapers do when they want to ‘suggest’ a person’s sexuality.

Having grown up in the 70s when being thought to be gay by others was enough to bring around the abuse, it was a bit disappointing to see the same (but more refined) approach being used on people who are long dead and cannot speak for themselves. Lord Leighton’s work is here which seems to be enough to decide he must have been gay.  I take the point, made by the curator, that many paintings were coded to convey messages that would have been picked up by gay people but that does not mean that all the Victorian artists here were gay themselves.

The two paintings I loved rose above the rest, with only the door of Oscar Wilde’s cell from Reading Prison of equal poignancy.  Lord Leighton’s ‘Icarus and Daedalus’ and Henry Scott Tuke’s ‘The Critics’ were stunning.

 

The Chinese Detective

BlogChineseDetectiveBack in the 80s the BBC broadcast two series of ‘The Chinese Detective’ with David Yip in the central role of John Ho, a keen policeman in London’s East End who has to solve crimes as well as battle the racism of his bosses.

It was a time when new police dramas were appearing, each with an ‘angle’ that made them distinct. The angle for this series is obvious but the distinction of being British Chinese did not last much beyond the first few episodes.  There was a running sub- plot about clearing the name of Ho’s father who had been wrongly convicted of a crime years before.  The suggestion was that his father took the blame because of his minority status.

In most episodes, and in series two there was no other Chinese face to be had, and very few faces characters that were not white- strange, really as this was London’s East End!

I had seen David Yip on stage a few years before and it was great to see him as the first British Chinese actor in a lead role.  I watched the episodes again many years later as a box set and loved seeing the old East End scenes, in the years before the area was transformed. The idea of a maverick police officer, ignoring procedures and protocol to solve a crime is somewhat tired now, and may have been then, but it was still an enjoyable experience to revisit old times.

‘The Chinese Detective’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?