Handsome Devil

Some films rise above cliché, or rather they take the clichés and make the most of them!  This film, like ‘Dead Poets Society’, has some moments that steer close to sentimentality without overdoing it.  The effect is uplifting and within the realms of realism.

This is another film set in the confining spaces of a private school.  This one, in Ireland, is ruled by rugby.  The boys who are good at sport are the top dogs and the misfits, like Ned, have to live with the taunts and insults; the biggest insult of all is to be called ‘gay’.  Into this world comes Conor, a star rugby player from another school.  His reputation precedes him as a great sportsman and a boy who fights all who annoy him.  He aims to keep his head down but this is a school that desperately wants to win the title and they see Conor as the answer to their prayers.

Ned and Conor are made to share a room.  The others sympathise that Conor must share with Ned but are then wrong footed when the two become friends.  Ned is abused for being gay and Conor is actually gay.  As the film progresses we see Conor deal with this identity conflict.

Add to the mix another ‘Dead Poets Society’ touch with an English teacher who inspires (some of) the pupils.  Connor sees in him something of himself and tries to seek his help.

Andrew Scott plays the teacher and Nicholas Galitzine plays Conor.  Fionn O’Shea plays Ned in this John Butler directed film. It is the type of movie that is feelgood without playing for easy laughs or simplistic endings.  Ultimately, the film is about identity and acceptance and we can never have too many films that tackle homophobia.

 

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Plan B

This gentle film from director Marco Berger covers an unusual angle in a relationship.  Bruno’s girlfriend ends their affair because she has met Pablo.  His plan to split the couple and get revenge on Pablo does not go well for Bruno.  First, when he sleeps with Laura again this does  not bring about the desired result.  Instead, he decides to pretend to have feelings for Pablo himself and lure him into a position where he can expose him as gay.

Bruno befriends Pablo as part of this plan B only to find that he actually does like him.  The more time they spend together, the more they discover they like each other and then, of course, they reach a point of questioning their own sexuality.

The film meanders to the point where their feelings are revealed but it is the better for this slow pace.  It handles well the point of disbelief when two men have to admit to themselves that what they are experiencing is love.

‘Plan B’ by Marco Berger is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

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The End of Eddy

This autobiographical novel is from young French novelist Edouard Louis.  It tells the hard hitting story of growing up as an outsider in poor circumstances in northern France.  Young Edouard knows he is different; the signs are in the reactions to him from everyone else.  Edouard is an effeminate ten year old boy when we first meet him.  His persona annoys his peer group and worries his parents.

His childhood is a story of learning that survival will depend heavily on regulating how he comes across.  What is surprising, and moving, is that the boy does not blame others for their reactions to him.  He accepts as normal that his manner and his attitudes (and later his sexuality) place him very low on life’s hierarchy.  At the top are the physically tough, his father and cousins among them.  These are the men who dominate his village. Hard physical jobs just to survive turn out tough, physical men whose attitudes to, and treatment of, women are shocking.  Their view of effeminate boys is equally as clear cut.

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There is a sense of triumph to the book, if only because the relating of the childhood experiences suggest survival, if nothing else.  Escape to the city must have provided the author with a second act where he was validated. How else would he have written a book that despite its grim subject is written with such beauty?

‘The End of Eddy’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Closet Monster

This Canadian film tells the story of a young, conflicted boy discovering his sexuality and trying to survive the fall out of his parents’ split.  His talking hamster helps him through and, although that sounds like a ‘cute’ device, it actually works well in this case.

Oscar witnessed a homophobic beating when he was young.  Years later, as an eighteen year old who is about to graduate he notices a new fellow employee at his weekend place of work. Wilder seems to be worldly-wise and a hit with everyone he meets and Oscar is attracted to him but traumatised by the childhood memories.

Oscar is artistic and dreams of enrolling on a make up course in New York City.  His best friend helps him out by modelling for him and their closeness leads Oscar’s father to believe they are in a relationship.  Things become uncertain when his plans fall apart and Wilder announces his imminent departure.

Set in St.John’s, Newfoundland the film and directed by Stephen Dunn, it is an excellent exploration of the confusion felt by some youngsters when they search for their place in the world. Themes of separation, homophobia and misplaced loyalties thread through the film yet it is ultimately a joyous celebration of youth and coming through difficult times.

‘Closet Monster’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Eyewitness

This Norwegian television series broadcast by Channel Four in Britain, in the excellent ‘Walter Presents…’ strand, was a superb thriller.  Henning and Philip are two school boys who have fallen in love.  They intend to keep their relationship a secret so head to a cabin in the woods using Henning’s well-known excursions for motocross rides.  Unfortunately, they are interrupted when a gang arrives with a prisoner in the boot of the car.  It is obviously an execution situation between rival gangs but it goes wrong when the prisoner gains the advantage and kills the others.  He then spots Philip and Henning so heads their way.

This is the scenario that turns into a police investigation; one that would be easier to solve if both Henning and Philip revealed their involvement.  Scared of being outed as gay, they continue to keep quiet even though they know that their information would help.  To make matters worse, Philip’s foster-mother, Helen, is the chief investigating officer.  With her husband, Sven, they look after Philip and presume every sign of odd behaviour has more to do with his concern for his mother than anything else.

Over six episodes, we see the investigation make headway despite some difficulties. When the killer turns up in the most unexpected place, the heat is turned up and the tension increases.  Two young men, desperate to keep their relationship secret, and a police investigation stymied by lack of important information makes for a high-class drama.

‘Eyewitness’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Moonstone

This novella by Icelandic writer, Sjon, is an interesting exploration of a young man making his way in the world.  Gay and prepared to take money for favours, our hero exists in Reykjavik in 1918 when a terrible flu epidemic hit the city.

This tragedy serves as a background to a story of a young man, Mani, who is in love with the cinema because it offers dreams of another life and who becomes an apprentice to a doctor during the worst of the crisis.  He goes into houses to find people at the edge of death or, in some cases, finds their corpses instead.

Mani is not ashamed of being gay and enjoys his encounters with his men as much as he likes the cinema.  This is not an anguished coming of age tale or rather the anguish is confined to the terrible events in the city.  Yet, there is an encounter with a Danish sailor at the independence celebrations.  It is this meeting that sends his life off in another direction.  Mani may be happy to be gay but he lives in a society that does not share his pride.

In such a short book, Sjon covers issues of belonging, identity and the threat on society from outside.  Flu, homosexuals and the cinema all act as alien influences in 1918 Reykjavik.

There is a coda that serves to connect the story to the author.  It explains, at last, the sub-title of the book: The Boy Who Never Was.

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Undressing Israel

This slight film from Michael Lucas is an exploration of what it means to be gay in modern Israel.  Despite being slightly arch in its central conceit that the audience will be shocked by the idea that Israel is a modern country, welcoming to gay people, there are some interesting moments and the people featured come across as well adjusted individuals.

The two men getting married, surrounded by their family, were my favourites but there was also the couple parenting two boys, an Arab- Israeli journalist, and a host of talking heads all explaining that it was a wonderful country in which to be gay.  The film director Eytam Fox was interviewed and he is always worth listening to.  Most attention is given to Tel Aviv and there are many questions left unanswered by this film such as what is it like to be gay in a rural community or far away from the vibrant party scene?

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An openly gay MP hosted a Pride event in the parliament near the start of the film and talked about the progress already made but the steps still needed.  The film provides an entirely positive look at gay life in Israel which is no bad thing when most films in this arena have issues to face.