A Passage to India

I studied this book by E.M. Forster for A Level.  Exams, especially in literature, are designed to drain all interest from what might otherwise have been a good novel. So, my views on this book have always been clouded somewhat by the background knowledge that I spent hours trying to deconstruct the meaning rather than enjoy it.

Nearly forty years later and I think sufficient time has passed to read it again and this time as a reader rather than as a pupil.  I was surprised by how much I appreciated the story, especially the way the narrative had been constructed.  Another casualty of the ‘set book syndrome’ is that you end up moving backwards and forwards across the text to identify themes or gather quotes to support an essay statement. Quite soon, the idea that the book has an arc and that the deeper meaning is layered across the plot is lost.

I remember having a soft spot for both Aziz and Fielding as Forster himself must have done.  The Indian doctor and the British headteacher have a friendship not reflected elsewhere in the society in which they lived.  The visitors, Mrs Moore and Miss Quested, while central to the drama have an outsiders view of relations between the races in the Raj.  Their connection to the ‘real’ India is one of observation of the exotic.  Fielding’s answer that they should try seeing Indians if they want to see India is at the heart of Forster’s message.

I was glad to return to this novel so many years later.  I sourced the version I used in a classroom in the 70s; I needed the same cover, size of book and feel of the pages. It worked for me.

‘A Passage to India’ by E. M. Forster is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

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King Alfred in Winchester

In Winchester so I had to walk down through the city to the statue of King Alfred which I first saw on a boyhood visit.  It is reassuring to see him still in place.  The King of Wessex was a fifth son so was never expected to rule the kingdom; he became an active student instead and devoted his time to learning.  He earned the title ‘great’ because he had a unique combination of statesmanship, scholarship and military skill.

The statue looking up the main street of the city shows him holding his sword in a gesture of victory or authority or both.  He stands at 17 feet from the plinth so is an imposing figure.  The artist Hamo Thorneycroft was a member of the Royal Academy.  His statue of Alfred was erected in 1899 to mark a thousand years since his death.

Despite being clean shaven in most other depictions of Alfred, including coinage from his reign, this sculpture has him with a full beard; the type of beard those late Victorians thought befitted a King!BlogKingAlfredWinchester

Handsome Devil

Some films rise above cliché, or rather they take the clichés and make the most of them!  This film, like ‘Dead Poets Society’, has some moments that steer close to sentimentality without overdoing it.  The effect is uplifting and within the realms of realism.

This is another film set in the confining spaces of a private school.  This one, in Ireland, is ruled by rugby.  The boys who are good at sport are the top dogs and the misfits, like Ned, have to live with the taunts and insults; the biggest insult of all is to be called ‘gay’.  Into this world comes Conor, a star rugby player from another school.  His reputation precedes him as a great sportsman and a boy who fights all who annoy him.  He aims to keep his head down but this is a school that desperately wants to win the title and they see Conor as the answer to their prayers.

Ned and Conor are made to share a room.  The others sympathise that Conor must share with Ned but are then wrong footed when the two become friends.  Ned is abused for being gay and Conor is actually gay.  As the film progresses we see Conor deal with this identity conflict.

Add to the mix another ‘Dead Poets Society’ touch with an English teacher who inspires (some of) the pupils.  Connor sees in him something of himself and tries to seek his help.

Andrew Scott plays the teacher and Nicholas Galitzine plays Conor.  Fionn O’Shea plays Ned in this John Butler directed film. It is the type of movie that is feelgood without playing for easy laughs or simplistic endings.  Ultimately, the film is about identity and acceptance and we can never have too many films that tackle homophobia.

 

Dead Poets Society

This film from director Peter Weir dates back to 1989 and remains in my hinterland as it was the perfect reflection of creativity as a means of forging an identity.  In a superior and self- regarding school in Vermont, USA in the 50s, a new English teacher is appointed.  He, too, is a former pupil of the school so knows the expectations and the code of such an institution.  Yet, he sees English Literature as the perfect model for teenage boys to learn about life.  His teaching methods are unusual but they inspire one group of boys in particular.

Enamoured of their teacher, the boys research his time at the school to discover that he was part of a club- the ‘Dead Poets Society’ of the title.  Without telling him, they re-form the club and use it to celebrate poetry and the idea of living life to the full.

I saw this film on the day of its release in UK and loved it.  Over the many years since then, I have seen it from time to time and. while understanding that the conventions (and clichés) of Hollywood can be clearly seen, it is still a heartwarming film.

The idea that teachers can change lives is a key theme and so is the idea that enthusiasts can ignite interest in people who thought they might not be interested.  So, too, is the idea that breaking out from conformity brings risks to all involved.  The film caught Robin Williams, so good as the inspirational teacher, at the cusp of his career from comedian to more sentimental roles.  His performance here is more restrained than some of the later crowd pleasing turns.  The performances of the younger actors, Robert Sean Leonard and Ethan Hawke in particular, were also strong.

‘Dead Poets Society’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

From East End to Land’s End

BlogEastEndLand'sEndI enjoy reading about history but especially the less well known aspects of key events from the past.  I thought I knew a lot about evacuees from London; my father was one, evacuated to Kent for the duration of the so- called phoney war and back in time for the Blitz!  This history by Susan Soyinka is fascinating and uncovered areas I had not previously considered and revealed new facts.  For example, there was highly efficient planning by the government for the evacuation of children from the larger cities but next to know co-ordination of their return. As a consequence, the authorities were unable to say with any certainty where children were.

The story told here is a specific one, though: Jewish children from the East End of London were evacuated with their school to Mousehole, beyond Penzance in Cornwall. The cultural change experienced by both locals and evacuees is related in an oral history that reveals the best of humanity as well as the resilience of people in times of war.

Many of the children from the Jews Free School were the ones who were not in the first wave of evacuation to Cambridgeshire.  As bombs fell more often on London, they were sent away by their parents and Cornwall was the designated receiving area.

The memories are well handled by Susan Soyinka who is clear when inconsistencies arise or where memories conflict with the records.  In part, the author shows us how she went about researching this history as she discusses her methods as well as her findings.

There are some remarkable insights into how the Jewish religious practices were kept alive in an area far from a synagogue and the story of the refugee children from Europe who, speaking no English, were also evacuated.  Their suspicions of trains and train journeys were understandable.

‘East End to Land’s End’ is a fascinating book.  It is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Carry on Teacher

The final scene of this film moved me when I was a child.  It all seems a little sentimental now but the moment when Ted Ray stepped out to face his pupils who had wrecked his chance of promotion to prevent him from leaving them is one of my all time favourite film moments.

I was a fan of the early Carry On films.  This 1959 film was the third in the series that eventually totalled thirty-one.  I saw it on British television in the 60s since it was released in cinemas before I was born!  The black and white story of an ambitious headteacher who sees the arrival of inspectors as his opportunity to snatch the headship of a brand new school is a good one.

Two of his pupils overhear him telling a teacher that, should he get the job, there will be opportunities for others.  They decide that the only way to keep their headteacher is to ensure the inspection is a disaster and they enlist their friends to make sure it is.  The comedy comes from the thwarted efforts of the head to impress and the inability of the teachers to cope with the breakdown of order.

In the current British education system the inspectorate is a malign growth and there is little to amuse there but this is from a kinder age and the story leads to the final scene which I loved as a boy.

The ‘Carry On’ films continued into the 60s and 70s and I loved most of them until the bawdy humour became distasteful.  Kenneth Williams, Hattie Jacques and Charles Hawtry were favourites of mine but, in this film, Ted Ray was the star. It was his only ‘Carry on’ role.

‘Carry On Teacher’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

That Love Is All There Is

This poem by Emily Dickinson reminds me of those days in English lessons as a teenager reading things that did not speak to my condition, only to lodge in my brain and come back to me at a time (and an age) when I made sense of it.

That Love Is All There Is

That Love is all there is,
Is all we know of Love;
It is enough, the freight should be
Proportioned to the groove.

Emily Dickinson

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