Migration Museum

The concept behind the Migration Museum is such a good one and is needed more than ever in our divided Brexit broken country.  This exhibition in temporary accommodation in Lambeth shows how seven major migration moments changed Britain.  The title of the exhibition is ‘No Turning Back’.

It is useful to be reminded about the history that has forged Britain especially when the version of history portrayed by many in the EU referendum is one rewritten to suit the Little Englanders currently in the ascendant.  Here we see that Britain has been connected to the world over the centuries with migrations in and out.  Seven critical moments are represented here through artefacts and artistic responses.

I was struck by how the events that formed my own political education have become ‘history’.  The Rock Against Racism movement of the 1970s was represented with magazine covers and posters that fought back against the racist comments from some musicians (ones I admired!) in an age when people thought it was okay to make such comments.  Also here, though, is the formation of the East India Company and the start of a strong connection between Britain and India as well as the expulsion of the Huguenots from Europe.  Migrations of which Britain should be proud include the refuge granted to Spanish children during their civil war of the 30s and the German Jewish children who were brought to safety to escape the Nazi regime in Germany.

The section which I liked the best was the celebration of mixed race Britain.  The 2011 census showed this to be a growing area of self-identity. It is the obvious next development of a multi-racial and multi- cultural society.

Photographs, art works, personal recollections and quotes all add up to an amazing exhibition in which to get lost on a wet afternoon.  I loved it.  As I finished, I was struck by a huge poster with a statement below it of a young man, who might be mixed race but who was not white,  who voted for Brexit.  I wanted/needed to know more.  Why did he?  What statement does it make that he is concerned about immigration in a society where he and others like him have been beneficiaries?  It troubles me still but maybe I need to be challenged in my assumptions.  In any case, there was no more from him on offer.




North Facing

This book by Tony Peake is short but it contains a big story in the limited number of pages.  It is a story of awakening in 60s South Africa.  Young Paul is different from his contemporaries in many ways, not least because his parents came to the country to avoid a grim post war Britain.  Here, they hoped to build a life for themselves among the white population whose attitudes are alien and sometimes hostile.

Paul has to board during the week and is desperate to belong.  He is included in a select group of pupils by a teacher who aims to broaden the minds of his charges by getting them to discuss the news.  Of more worth to the young Paul is the attention from popular boy Andre Du Toit.  The gang that gather around this boy vie for preferment.  Du Toit encourages them by keeping a pecking order and regularly demoting boys so that their loyalty is always to them and not each other.

Paul watches as his parents also try to belong and the attention of Du Toit’s father.  What starts as acceptance turns into something else when the questions about the regime threaten to spoil a useful friendship.

The story is told in flashback so we have an adult Paul driving in modern day South Africa in search of a person who may have been more influential than he realised when he was a boy.  This person stands as a role model for the adult Paul and represents the moral code that was missing in apartheid South Africa.  The crossing of boundaries involves the race issue as well as class and nationality and, finally, sexuality.

‘North Facing’ by Tony Peake is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?


Black and British

David Olusoga’s book has the sub-title ‘A Forgotten History’ so his work is timely since it sets the record straight in terms of the multi-cultural nature of British society.  Since Roman times there has been a black presence on these islands and, as he shows in chapters that proceed chronologically, there has been a black participation in the life of the country ever since.

Some of the participants were not voluntary members of society, of course, since they were here as slaves.  One of the sad trends related here is the fashion for young enslaved black boys or girls to attend the rich in their houses only to be cast out when they have grown older and less appealing.

The noble history of the campaign to end the slave trade is given a lot of space but so also is the less well known accommodations given to the merchants who built their fortunes on slavery.  Compensation was paid!  The role of Thomas Clarkson was given prominence even though the sons of Wilberforce tried to play down his contribution at the same time as promoting the part played by their father.

The chapter on the second world war was informative in terms of the racism debate and the extent to which British attitudes were shaped by the insistence that the American colour (color) bar was maintained over here.  It is pleasing to think that the British were less prejudiced but the subsequent history, including the reluctance of the Attlee government to import black labour in the post war period, suggests that it was not an exclusively American attitude.

This was an excellent ‘opening up’ of an important part of British history and I was glad to have read it.  BlogBlackBritish

Taylor Wessing Photographic Prize 2017

I have been going to this exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery for 9 years.  This was the tenth exhibition so I must have missed just the very first year.  As usual, I was impressed by so many pictures and played the game of awarding my own first and second prizes.  So often, my selection is different from the judges but, even though I bow to their greater knowledge and expertise, I use just the criterion ‘do I like it?’.  It works for me.

The winner as identified by the official judges was an amazing portrait of a refugee rescued from the Mediterranean.  His face conveys so many things but the context makes it a powerful portrait of hope and determination.  The young man stares at the camera. The photograph was taken by Cesar Dezfuli.

My personal favourites were the two young men locked in an embrace that seems both brotherly and strong.  This image by Baud Postma was on the front cover of the catalogue.  The third image that impressed me was also more to do with the context.  Craig Easton photographed sixteen year olds from around Britain.  The subjects also wrote about themselves.  Paddy couldn’t write so his sister did it for him.  He ‘spoke’ about being a traveller and about the loss of his brother and then father in a powerful testimony.

This annual visit to the National Portrait Gallery has become a fixture in my year.

BFI Archive: Race Relations

I have been exploring the excellent BFI archive recently and came across two documentaries about race relations in Britain.  The first, from the 60s, was part of the ITV current affairs series ‘This Week’ and the second from the ITV current affairs series, ‘World in Action’.  I may well have seen the second of these programmes, called ‘Black to Front’ since I was a keen watcher of ‘World in Action’ in the 70s as well as an awakening political activist.

‘Black to Front’ covered the by-election in Lambeth Central in 1978 when the threat of the racist National Front was all too real.  The far right party had gone through a period of rising support, especially in parliamentary by-elections, often defeating the, then, third-party the Liberals into fourth place.  This particular by-election was important as Brixton, with its increasing black population, was part of the constituency.


In Leeds in 1965, the late great Desmond Wilcox interviewed families for a documentary called ‘The Negro Next Door’.  The attitudes of the white residents seem somewhat shocking today but Wilcox was a brilliant journalist and his questions kept gently probing the preconceptions.

Despite being a decade apart, both documentaries took one street to act as a microcosm of the whole nation.  In both programmes, neighbours were brought together to discuss the issues.  This was more awkward and revealing in the 1965 documentary since the attitudes had yet to soften or get hidden behind a veneer of politeness.


The BFI archive is fascinating with many programmes available free of charge.  It acts as a fascinating resource for seeing how the country has changed (or not) and how social attitudes build national character.  I like going through programmes from my younger years even if I missed them at the time.  Watching the world as it once was, from traffic to fashion, is a way of revisiting my childhood and teenage years.

These documentaries from the BFI archive are in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

My Brother’s Husband

This manga by Japanese artist and writer Gengoroh Tagame provides an interesting insight into a society where being gay is rarely celebrated.  The story involves a visit from a foreigner whose presence in the lives of a father and his daughter makes the father reflect on his views and prejudices.

Single parent Yaichi brings up his daughter Kana, earning a living by renting out property in the local area. This gives him time to look after his daughter, something he does with great love and care.  Kana’s mother lives elsewhere but is still part of her life; she visits and stays in the family home but obviously has a high powered job elsewhere.

Into their lives comes Mike, a Canadian visiting Tokyo to see the childhood places his husband talked about before he died.  Mike’s husband, Ryoji, was Yaichi’s brother.

Kana adores Mike from first meeting and insists he stay at their house.  Yaichi feels obliged to agree and the manga tells the story of Mike’s time with the father and daughter.  Yaichi confronts his own prejudices and sees Mike through his daughter’s eyes, coming to terms as he does so with his feelings about his brother and how he handled his coming out.

It is a brilliant tale of accepting people for who they are and seeing beyond labels. The homophobia in society is raised through reactions of local people to Mike’s arrival but, in what was for me the most poignant scene, the arrival of a teenage boy to their door shows that gay people do exist in Japan and the need for validation is of high importance.

‘My Brother’s Husband’ is in my hinterland. What’s in yours?

Yin + Yang

This film about film is an interesting exploration of gender in Chinese cinema by director Stanley Kwan Kam-pang.  The sub-title, ‘Gender in Chinese Cinema’ sets us up for a documentary of interviews and film clips around gender fluidity in films by Chinese directors.

Many of the films are ones I am familiar with such as ‘Farewell My Concubine’ and ‘Vive L’amour’ but there were others that have now been added to the list of films to hunt down.  Interestingly, many of the directors and actors deny any connection between their work and the idea of being gay, and even deny the work having gay themes.  Leslie Cheung answers questions about so frequently being cast in effeminate roles as recognising in himself a certain degree of vulnerability.

Kwan presents the film in ‘chapters’ starting with his own experiences as a child, being taken to the male bath houses by his father and ending with his interview with his mother when he asks her if it concerns her that she has a gay son.  Between, we see images of male bonding from martial arts films and others and images of masculinity in both men and women.  The Chinese Opera is a rich resource for crossing gender norms and this is explored, yet it seems, in the late 90s at least, that Hong Kong and Taiwan were more open to expressions of homosexuality than mainland China.  It may have changed!

It comes across as something of a period piece itself, now, but the documentary, narrated by Tony Rayns, is worth watching for the signs that things are shifting in cinema.