Saigon Calling

The work of Joe Sacco inspired me to find more graphic novels and graphic reportage so, after years of never going near the shelf with all the ‘comic books’, I now look out for new titles that are worth reading.  This memoir by Marcelino Truong is brilliant.  It follows an earlier work that I have yet to read but this volume covering the years 1963- 1975 is an excellent evocation of an interesting era.  It makes it more interesting that the author/artist has dual heritage: his mother was French and his father Vietnamese.  His father’s job in the Embassy in London brought the family to Britain and, although he changed jobs, this where they stayed.

Truong combines information about the Vietnam War with a personal family story.  Where the two overlap, the most insights are to be found.  In some senses, this is the story of every family.  ‘Marco’ grew up in London at the same time I did so the references, both pictorial and written, to the changing times are of particular interest.  So, too, is the invitation to consider the Vietnam War from a different angle.  It isn’t the American angle but neither is it the contrary North Vietnamese view of things. Instead, Marco sees the radical students around him supporting the anti- colonial forces of the north and cannot understand why the communists are seen as benign.  His position is one of concern for the family and friends in South Vietnam.

As his hair grew longer in the 70s so did his understanding of what was actually going on in Vietnam.  When he moves to France as a teenager, he continues to find himself in the middle of the conflict between North Vietnamese supporting students and those who support the ‘western values’.

This memoir has a parallel story, though.  It is one of being of mixed heritage and of living with a mother who has bipolar disorder.  The effect of these two factors in his growing up and the directions taken by each of his siblings make for a poignant reminder of what family life can be.

‘Saigon Calling’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?BlogSaigonCalling

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Süskind

This Dutch film by director Rudolph Van den Berg from 2012 tells the story of Walter Süskind a German Jew who helped Jewish children escape from the transports to concentration camps from Amsterdam.

The story shows how the organisation of the transports was facilitated by a Jewish Council. The German occupying army insisted that Jews were deported so lists were drawn up to make sure this happened.  The Council had a large role to play in this and the film explores the conflict faced by Walter in aiding the operation.  His German background helped him develop something of a friendship with the German officer overseeing the deportations.

His role as manager of the theatre was pivotal when the building became used as the mustering station for people preparing to leave.  Over the road was a nursery that was used as a gathering point for the children. His access to both allowed him to manipulate the lists and keep the children off the transports to Westerbork.

As the film progresses, so does Walter’s understanding of the purpose of the transports and we see how he tries to reconcile his role in this with his Jewishness.  Around him are characters who articulate the different viewpoints on how to handle their situation.  With his own family under threat, the need to save children becomes his guiding principle.

The film ends with a note of optimism, not easy given that history tells us that all of his family died at the hands of the Nazis.  There is a message at the end in support of the charity, War Child, in recognition that children are too often the victims of wars they did not cause.

 

The Singing Ringing Tree

Children’s television in my youth was an electic collection of styles and genres, maybe more than it is today.  I suppose it was a complete television service in miniature.  The BBC used to show drama series under the umbrella title of ‘Tales from Europe’ and the one that stood out, possibly because it was so unusual, was ‘The Singing Ringing Tree’ from East Germany.

I saw the series in the 60s; it was repeated several times over the years.  It was actually made in 1957 by the East German DEFA studio as a film.  The rather surreal story of a difficult and spoilt princess who rejects the proposal of a prince and all the gifts he offers has to be seen to be believed.  She challenges him to present her with the mythical singing ringing tree of the title.

The series involves a bear, an evil dwarf and a giant fish.  The singing, ringing tree will only sing if the prince and princess are in love so the ending is always in sight with no great surprises but a lot of fun on the way.

‘The Singing Ringing Tree’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

 

Top Cat

BlogTopCat1There should be a law in Britain against using cultural icons from my childhood in adverts on television.  It is bad enough when people I admire sell their talents to companies I would rather not support but when cartoon characters turn up in modern form to push profits the anachronism is too much.  The latest cultural vandalism is against Top Cat and his gang.

The good news, I suppose, is that it made me think back to the 60s when BBC television broadcast the series ‘Boss Cat’ featuring Top Cat and the lovable rogues who formed his gang.  Brain was always my favourite although Benny the Ball came a close second.

It took me years to work out why it was called ‘Boss Cat’ on BBC when the character was Top Cat: there was a British cat food called ‘Top Cat’ and the rules on advertising on BBC television meant that broadcasters considered it safer to change the name.  It was a stupid move really since we all talked about Top Cat and never Boss Cat.

The series was American, created by Hanna- Barbera who made so many of our favourite cartoon series.  At the heart of each episode a story about the cats outwitting Officer Dibble.  Their get- rich- quick schemes rarely worked but were lots of fun.  Best of all, I just have to think of the characters to hear their voices across the years.

 

The End of Eddy

This autobiographical novel is from young French novelist Edouard Louis.  It tells the hard hitting story of growing up as an outsider in poor circumstances in northern France.  Young Edouard knows he is different; the signs are in the reactions to him from everyone else.  Edouard is an effeminate ten year old boy when we first meet him.  His persona annoys his peer group and worries his parents.

His childhood is a story of learning that survival will depend heavily on regulating how he comes across.  What is surprising, and moving, is that the boy does not blame others for their reactions to him.  He accepts as normal that his manner and his attitudes (and later his sexuality) place him very low on life’s hierarchy.  At the top are the physically tough, his father and cousins among them.  These are the men who dominate his village. Hard physical jobs just to survive turn out tough, physical men whose attitudes to, and treatment of, women are shocking.  Their view of effeminate boys is equally as clear cut.

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There is a sense of triumph to the book, if only because the relating of the childhood experiences suggest survival, if nothing else.  Escape to the city must have provided the author with a second act where he was validated. How else would he have written a book that despite its grim subject is written with such beauty?

‘The End of Eddy’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Journey to the Volcano

BlogJourneyVolcanoThinking of Rose Tremain reminded me of the first of her books I read.  It was a children’s book, if that label is needed, and is, I think, the only one she has written.  In any case, it signaled to me that this was a writer worth following.

‘Journey to the Volcano’ is the story of George who is taken by his mother, without his father’s knowledge, to Sicily where she came from.  She is following her intuition that her son needs to spend time with her family before it is too late.  Her own mother, George’s Nonna, is quite old.  The volcano is a volatile place and the brooding mountain hangs over the village.

We follow George to Italy but also see the effect on his father.  The story of how his parents met is relayed and the differences in their temperaments is shown in their different approaches to their son.

In the end, it is George who has the insights.  The drama in the story comes from a significant event.  When the summer ends, George has much to reflect on but so too does his father and his mother.  This a journey that changes them all.

‘Journey to the Volcano’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

Lines and Squares

This is a poem from my youth, read to us as very young children by a teacher in our 1960s classroom.  I recall the collection of AA Milne poems ‘When We Were Very Young’ with a blue border in the hands of my teacher as she read to us.

Lines and Squares

Whenever I walk in a London street,
I’m ever so careful to watch my feet;
And I keep in the squares,
And the masses of bears,
Who wait at the corners all ready to eat
The sillies who tread on the lines of the street
Go back to their lairs,
And I say to them, “Bears,
Just look how I’m walking in all the squares!”

And the little bears growl to each other, “He’s mine,
As soon as he’s silly and steps on a line.”
And some of the bigger bears try to pretend
That they came round the corner to look for a friend;
And they try to pretend that nobody cares
Whether you walk on the lines or squares.
But only the sillies believe their talk;
It’s ever so portant how you walk.
And it’s ever so jolly to call out, “Bears,
Just watch me walking in all the squares!”

A A Milne

BlogAAMILNE