Gravel Heart

BlogGravelHeartI am a great fan of the novels of Abdulrazak Gurnah so this new story is very welcome. Once again, he writes of dislocation through living in another country yet unable to leave the old country behind.  In this case, the story of Salim starts with the unravelling of his parents’ marriage for reasons that remain unclear until the end of the book.  It is clear to Salim, though, that everyone else seems to know more than they are telling him.

His life is Zanzibar becomes one of trying to work out the reason his parents live apart, his father in depressed circumstances.  The presence of an Uncle, brother to his mother, offers a solution: the young man can live with Uncle Amir in London where he lives well with his own family in Holland Park in London; the diplomatic service offer good homes to their people.  So, once again, Salim finds himself adrift but this time in a foreign country.  He comes close to the parental secret on one occasion but otherwise continues semi- detached from the family.  When he takes a decision about his own future that annoys Amir, he leaves for a less well off part of London and a more independent stage of his life, one that eventually takes him to Brighton before returning to London.

Wherever he lives, though, Zanzibar is present.  He has contact with his mother but does not build the bridges he thinks he should, especially when she marries again and has a daughter.

Salim finds love but, once more, does not fit in.  It takes a family death to bring the resolution he needs.  He travels back to his home for rituals and for home truths.

One of the decisions he made for himself back in Holland Park was to abandon Business Studies for Literature, a decision that was to stand him in good stead when his family secret resembles a plot from a Shakespearian play.  The book must be read to discover which one.  Salim is a character I wanted to follow.  I wanted it to turn out well for him. He deserved it.  ‘Gravel Heart’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

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