Shadows of the Pomegranate Tree

This novel by Tariq Ali is the first of his ‘Islam Quintet’.  I have read several of his non-fiction works and his journalism; I have even heard him speak at a literary festival. This is the first time I have read any of his fiction.  I was attracted to it by the subject matter of this first novel.

The story starts in Cordoba where a bonfire of books took place after the reconquest of Spain by the forces of Isabella and Ferdinand.  From this we encounter characters of both sides of the religious divide but especially the Banu Hadyl family who are forced, like all Muslims to make a decision about their faith: convert, go into exile or die.

BlogPomegranate TreeThe ending is inevitable, especially to those who know the history, but the sense of loss from a time when different religions co-existed is huge.  Instead, we see war and politics carried out as a form of religious devotion or maybe religion is used as the cover for the usual manipulations of states and monarchs.

In general, Tariq Ali’s non-fiction is more cohesive than his fiction but his passion for his subjects is still clear as if his determination to steer us away from a Eurocentric view of the world.  In these times of religious intolerance, it is good to be reminded that there was, and is, a better way of living with each other.  It is also important to realise that Islam is wider and more complex than it is often portrayed in our media.

‘Shadows of the Pomegranate Tree’ is worth reading.  It is in my hinterland. What’s in yours?

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s