Closet Monster

This Canadian film tells the story of a young, conflicted boy discovering his sexuality and trying to survive the fall out of his parents’ split.  His talking hamster helps him through and, although that sounds like a ‘cute’ device, it actually works well in this case.

Oscar witnessed a homophobic beating when he was young.  Years later, as an eighteen year old who is about to graduate he notices a new fellow employee at his weekend place of work. Wilder seems to be worldly-wise and a hit with everyone he meets and Oscar is attracted to him but traumatised by the childhood memories.

Oscar is artistic and dreams of enrolling on a make up course in New York City.  His best friend helps him out by modelling for him and their closeness leads Oscar’s father to believe they are in a relationship.  Things become uncertain when his plans fall apart and Wilder announces his imminent departure.

Set in St.John’s, Newfoundland the film and directed by Stephen Dunn, it is an excellent exploration of the confusion felt by some youngsters when they search for their place in the world. Themes of separation, homophobia and misplaced loyalties thread through the film yet it is ultimately a joyous celebration of youth and coming through difficult times.

‘Closet Monster’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

This is Your Life

BlogEamonnAndrewsThere were many television programmes in my childhood that I took for granted and only appreciated once they were gone. ‘This is Your Life’ was one example of a show that was simple on format but very enjoyable when the surprised guest was right. Throughout the seventies, I was aware of this programme, presented by Eamonn Andrews.  He had actually presented it in its initial British version from the 50s to 1964 and then again from 1969 until he died in 1987.  Michael Aspel took over for a time in the late 80s until it finished in 2003.  Although I saw some of the Aspel programmes it is Eamonn Andrews I remember well, along with the music of Thames Television’s audio ‘ident’.

Back in the 70s, with a limited number of television channels, each programme was guaranteed a very large audience so television series as this were known to most of the country.  Watching a famous person being surprised by Eamonn Andrews was part of the fun; the ‘victims’ were never in the know but they knew what seeing Eamonn Andrews meant, especially when he had a red book in his hands.

The episodes I remember best of all were Frankie Howerd’s when he cried, made especially poignant when it later turned out that his partner in life was discretely placed across the stage; heterosexual couples sat side by side!  I also remember Reg Varney from the phenomenally successful sit-com ‘On the Buses’ looking alarmed when his rehearsed spot was interrupted by the red book.

It was classed as popular entertainment but, like much of television from that era, it treated the audience’s intelligence with respect.

Lines and Squares

This is a poem from my youth, read to us as very young children by a teacher in our 1960s classroom.  I recall the collection of AA Milne poems ‘When We Were Very Young’ with a blue border in the hands of my teacher as she read to us.

Lines and Squares

Whenever I walk in a London street,
I’m ever so careful to watch my feet;
And I keep in the squares,
And the masses of bears,
Who wait at the corners all ready to eat
The sillies who tread on the lines of the street
Go back to their lairs,
And I say to them, “Bears,
Just look how I’m walking in all the squares!”

And the little bears growl to each other, “He’s mine,
As soon as he’s silly and steps on a line.”
And some of the bigger bears try to pretend
That they came round the corner to look for a friend;
And they try to pretend that nobody cares
Whether you walk on the lines or squares.
But only the sillies believe their talk;
It’s ever so portant how you walk.
And it’s ever so jolly to call out, “Bears,
Just watch me walking in all the squares!”

A A Milne

BlogAAMILNE

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze

In all the fuss over BBC salaries this week, I heard nothing about the quality of the presenters and the relative merits of their salaries.  Bridget Kendall came to mind as an example of the very best of BBC journalists.  I wonder what she got paid!

This second series of ‘Cold War Stories’ was essential listening.  Just like the first series broadcast on BBC Radio Four last year, it is made up of fifteen minute episodes, each relating a specific event in the Cold War, with contributions from people who actually took part.  It takes off where the last series ended with the death of Khrushchev and follows on chronologically, taking in events such as the fall of Saigon, the Prague Spring, the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, and the birth of Solidarity in Poland.  There are also episodes on the proxy war in Africa and the Chinese Cultural Revolution.  Later episodes cover the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Bridget Kendall is now Master (!) of Peterhouse College, Cambridge. Her expertise in Russian made her an outstanding journalist for the BBC and this series reminded me of her contributions to bulletins when a trusted voice was essential.

BlogBridgetKendall

Eyewitness

This Norwegian television series broadcast by Channel Four in Britain, in the excellent ‘Walter Presents…’ strand, was a superb thriller.  Henning and Philip are two school boys who have fallen in love.  They intend to keep their relationship a secret so head to a cabin in the woods using Henning’s well-known excursions for motocross rides.  Unfortunately, they are interrupted when a gang arrives with a prisoner in the boot of the car.  It is obviously an execution situation between rival gangs but it goes wrong when the prisoner gains the advantage and kills the others.  He then spots Philip and Henning so heads their way.

This is the scenario that turns into a police investigation; one that would be easier to solve if both Henning and Philip revealed their involvement.  Scared of being outed as gay, they continue to keep quiet even though they know that their information would help.  To make matters worse, Philip’s foster-mother, Helen, is the chief investigating officer.  With her husband, Sven, they look after Philip and presume every sign of odd behaviour has more to do with his concern for his mother than anything else.

Over six episodes, we see the investigation make headway despite some difficulties. When the killer turns up in the most unexpected place, the heat is turned up and the tension increases.  Two young men, desperate to keep their relationship secret, and a police investigation stymied by lack of important information makes for a high-class drama.

‘Eyewitness’ is in my hinterland.  What’s in yours?

A Horse Walks Into A Bar

BlogHorseWalksBarNovels by David Grossman build layer upon layer until all becomes clear.  It takes time for the fog to clear and to see the essential point of one of his novels and this latest story is no exception.  ‘Fog’ is not the right metaphor, though, because Grossman writes with great clarity.  In this case, a comedian takes the stage to perform his act and a special guest in the audience watches and comments on what can be seen.

The comedian, Dovaleh Greenstein, is telling jokes and stringing the audience along with a story from his youth.  The story is more tragic than funny and the audience has its patience stretched at times.  This is where the insights of the invited guest come in.  We see how other audience members react.

There are jokes here, some of them effective but the main point is to watch the stand-up comedian use the forum for a confessional about an event that proved pivotal in his life. The book must be read to gain the experience and it is for readers to assess how far this story is also the story of a nation.

David Grossman’s novels are in my hinterland.   What’s in yours?

Moonstone

This novella by Icelandic writer, Sjon, is an interesting exploration of a young man making his way in the world.  Gay and prepared to take money for favours, our hero exists in Reykjavik in 1918 when a terrible flu epidemic hit the city.

This tragedy serves as a background to a story of a young man, Mani, who is in love with the cinema because it offers dreams of another life and who becomes an apprentice to a doctor during the worst of the crisis.  He goes into houses to find people at the edge of death or, in some cases, finds their corpses instead.

Mani is not ashamed of being gay and enjoys his encounters with his men as much as he likes the cinema.  This is not an anguished coming of age tale or rather the anguish is confined to the terrible events in the city.  Yet, there is an encounter with a Danish sailor at the independence celebrations.  It is this meeting that sends his life off in another direction.  Mani may be happy to be gay but he lives in a society that does not share his pride.

In such a short book, Sjon covers issues of belonging, identity and the threat on society from outside.  Flu, homosexuals and the cinema all act as alien influences in 1918 Reykjavik.

There is a coda that serves to connect the story to the author.  It explains, at last, the sub-title of the book: The Boy Who Never Was.

BlogMoonstone